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Sixty-ninth session,
51st & 52nd Meetings (AM & PM)
GA/SHC/4125

Third Committee Approves New Text Protecting Children from Bullying, Sending 14 Drafts to General Assembly

Despite Differences, Committee Reaches Consensus on Religious Freedom, Enforced Disappearance, Strategies to End Violence against Women, Girls

Approving a new draft resolution on protecting children from bullying, the Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) took action on and sent a total of 14 draft texts to the General Assembly.

By the terms of the draft text on bullying, the General Assembly would recognize that bullying, including cyberbullying, can have a potential long-term impacts on the enjoyment of the human rights of children, and urged Member States to take all appropriate measures to prevent and protect children, including in school, from any form of violence, including forms of bullying.  By the draft text, the Assembly would also urge all Member States to share national experiences and best practices for preventing and tackling bullying, including cyberbullying.

Various delegates expressed support for the draft resolution, with some saying bullying was a serious problem.

After its approval, the representative of Italy, speaking on behalf of the European Union, told the Committee that the draft text had raised international awareness on the issue of bullying.  Evidence had shown that bullying affected all those involved, resulting in emotional problems, aggression and even suicide.

Some children were bullied due to their economic situations or disabilities, others due to gender stereotypes or their gender identity, he added.  Expressing regret that those issues were not included adequately in the draft resolution, he hoped for the report of the Secretary-General on bullying to reflect the situation on the ground, and to develop suggestions on how to deal with it.

Indeed, bullying happened in all parts of the world, said Chile’s delegate, pointing out that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) children were at heightened risk.

Yet some speakers questioned the tabling of the draft resolution during the current session.  Djibouti’s representative, speaking on behalf of the African Group, said that in light of the current absence of a report of the Secretary-General on that issue, as well as of a common understanding of the issue, she said a substantive resolution was premature.  Instead, the issue of bullying should have been reflected in the omnibus resolution on rights of the child.

The Committee also approved, by a recorded vote of 148 in favour to 4 against (Canada, Israel, United Kingdom, United States), with 27 abstentions, a draft resolution on the right to development, by the terms of which the Assembly would stress the need to strive for greater acceptance, operationalization and realization of the right to development at the international and national levels.

Further terms of that text would emphasize the urgent need for taking concrete and effective measures to prevent corruption at all levels, and stressed the importance of a genuine political commitment on the part of all Governments through a firm legal framework.

During the consideration of that resolution, Iran’s representative stressed that the international financial and economic crises had severely affected the economies of the developing countries.  She called upon the United Nations and its specialized agencies to mainstream the right to development in their policies and operational activities.

Reflecting another perspective, the representative of the United States said that development should be fostered by the promotion of individual human rights.  Further, her country could not abide by the language regarding an international legal agreement on this topic.  The United Kingdom’s representative stated that the right to development should not be politicized.

A recorded vote was also required for a draft resolution on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights, which was approved with 128 votes in favour to 53 against, with 1 abstention (Papua New Guinea).

While the representative of Egypt stated that it was necessary to enhance international cooperation in dealing with challenges globalization caused in developing countries, some speakers outlined positive effects of globalization on the full enjoyment of all human rights.

Also taking a recorded vote today was the draft resolution on human rights and unilateral coercive measures, which the Committee approved with 124 in favour, to 52 against, with 2 abstentions (Central African Republic, Chad).

The Committee also approved, without a vote, two resolutions on the advancement of women.  By the terms of a draft resolution on the intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls, the General Assembly would stress that “violence against women” means any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women and girls.

Although that draft resolution was approved without a recorded vote, some delegates offered differing opinions as they considered the text’s nuances.  “Girls are children”, said the representative of the Russian Federation, and measures to prevent violence against women were insufficient for protecting girls.  She lamented that the draft resolution viewed human rights for women solely through a prism of sexual and reproductive rights.

The representative of Malta expressed support for efforts to combat violence against women, but said that her delegation opposed emergency contraception, as it was a denial of the most important human right: the right to life.  The representative of Saudi Arabia reiterated her delegation’s rejection to the imposition of any language in the text that did not respect cultural and religious values.

Other draft resolutions approved today without a recorded vote were on the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals for persons with Disabilities, enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights, human rights and unilateral coercive measures, freedom of religion or belief, on combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons, based on religion or belief as well as another on human rights and extreme poverty.

Speaking today were representatives of Saudi Arabia, India, Viet Nam, Brazil, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Belarus, China, Japan, Norway, Singapore, Cuba, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Netherlands, Sudan, Philippines, Uruguay, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Mexico, Argentina, Italy (national capacity), United Kingdom, Albania, Canada, Panama, South Africa, Australia, Costa Rica and Liechtenstein, as well as the Holy See.

The Third Committee will meet next at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 25 November, to take action on a number of draft resolutions.

Background

The Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) met this morning to continue its consideration of a draft resolution on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (document A/C.3/69/L.32).  For background, see Press Release GA/SHC/4124 of 21 November.

The Committee was also expected to take action on draft resolutions on: realizing the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals for persons with disabilities towards 2015 and beyond (document A/C.3/69/L.10/Rev.1); follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing (document A/C.3/69/L.14/Rev.2); intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls (document A/C.3/69/L.19/Rev.1); trafficking in women and girls (document A/C.3/69/L.21/Rev.1); enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (document A/C.3/69/L.60); and combating bullying and other types of violence against children (document A/C.3/69/L.25/Rev.1).

It would also take action on draft resolutions on: the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (document A/C.3/69/L.34); globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights (document A/C.3/69/L.38); combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons, based on religion or belief (document A/C.3/69/L.39/Rev.1); freedom of religion or belief (document A/C.3/69/L.40/Rev.1); enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights (document A/C.3/69/L.44); and human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/C.3/69/L.45).

The Committee would also take up a draft resolution concerning the right to development (document A/C.3/69/L.46); human rights and extreme poverty (document A/C.3/69/L.48/Rev.1); and preventing and combating corrupt practices and the transfer of proceeds of corruption, facilitating asset recovery and returning such assets to legitimate owners, in particular to countries of origin, in accordance with the United Nations Convention against Corruption (document A/C.3/69/L.18/Rev.1).

Action on Draft Resolutions

The Committee continued its discussion on a draft text on human rights in Myanmar (A/C.3/69/L.32), which was approved without a recorded vote on 21 November.

Several countries made general statements after its approval.

Speaking on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, the representative of Saudi Arabia said the group had decided to join the consensus on the draft resolution.  Thanking other countries for their constructive cooperation, the group hoped to continue to have similar dialogues on the situation of human rights in all parts of the world.

The representative of India emphasized that over the past few years, the Government of Myanmar had taken significant steps to improve the human rights situation in the country.  His country had supported Myanmar in its efforts to strengthen good governance and the rule of law.

Viet Nam’s representative said that his country had joined the consensus on the issue.  Welcoming Myanmar’s sincere engagement, he noted that the Government had taken significant steps towards political and economic reform, democratization, national reconciliation and the promotion and protection of human rights.

Brazil’s representative said the text was an outcome of a constructive engagement.  Welcoming positive developments on the promotion and protection of human rights and the reform efforts that had been undertaken to date, she encouraged the Government of Myanmar to take further steps to consolidate the progress made and to address outstanding concerns.

The representative of Lao People's Democratic Republic said the draft resolution had been approved by consensus.  His delegation believed that the Universal Periodic Review was the best way to address the human rights situation.

The representative of the United States said that her delegation recognized the progress Myanmar had made in building the foundation of a sustainable democracy.  Commending Member States for finding consensus on the resolution, she said that the draft text underscored the significant remaining challenges, such as enhancing freedom for journalists and finding durable solutions to violence in parts of the country.

The representative of Belarus said that country-specific resolutions could not be viewed as legitimate.  The countries initiating the resolution were attempting to control the activities of the Government of the country concerned by pressuring them.  Such resolutions should not be brought to the consideration of the Assembly.  Belarus was removing itself from the consensus on the draft resolution, and wished to have that reflected in the records.

The representative of China said that his country was opposed to the politicization of human rights questions.  Country-specific resolutions did not present the right approach.  No further resolutions targeting Myanmar should be proposed in the future.

The representative of Iran said that his delegation had joined the consensus on the draft resolution, but wished to reiterate his country’s principled position that the promotion of human rights was best achieved through cooperation, and not with country-specific resolutions that constituted selectivity and double standards.

The representative of Japan said that his delegation had joined the consensus on the draft resolution because it believed in sending a united message from the international community in recognizing progress in Myanmar.  The draft resolution also urged further efforts and engagement from Myanmar.  A critical future test of the reforms was the upcoming elections, he said, calling on the Government of Myanmar to make the elections credible and inclusive.

The representative of the Russian Federation said the European Union-promoted resolution on Myanmar did not advance the goal of human rights, and could even produce a negative effect.  Despite the consensus, her delegation believed that such resolutions did not have any validity.

The representative of Norway thanked the European Union for their cooperation, and welcomed continued positive developments in Myanmar.  However, she noted that there were ongoing human rights violations and abuses in the country, including arbitrary arrests and detentions, and forced displacement.

The representative of Singapore said her delegation did not support country-specific resolutions.

Cuba’s representative said his country was against country specific resolutions.  Reiterating his delegation’s commitment to the principles of impartiality and non-selectivity, he said Cuba had not joined the consensus.

The representative of Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, echoing previous statements, said his delegation opposed country-specific resolutions, which should be abolished in order to achieve non-selectivity and impartiality.

As the Committee turned towards other drafts, the representative of Bolivia informed the Chair that the draft text on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing (document A/C.3/69/L.14/Rev.2) was still being negotiated, and requested postponement of its consideration.

The Committee then took up a draft resolution on the intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women and girls (document A/C.3/69/L.19/Rev.1).

Making a general statement before action on the draft resolution, the representative of the Netherlands introduced an oral revision, noting that one in every three women became a victim to violence once in her life.  His country and France had been tabling the draft resolution for the last eight years to encourage Member States to take action against such violence.  The draft resolution would send a strong and important message that violence against women was unacceptable.

The Committee then approved the draft text without a vote.

Speaking after that action, the representative of the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See welcomed the draft text’s approval and thanked co-facilitators, which had made that process possible.  However, he expressed a reservation on the draft text, and disassociated himself from the paragraph addressing issues of emergency contraception and abortion.

The representative of Malta said her delegation supported the international community in its efforts to combat violence against women.  However, Malta opposed emergency contraception, as it was a denial of the most important human right: the right to live.

The representative of Saudi Arabia said her country had taken serious steps to prevent violence against women.  Also, she reiterated her delegation’s rejection to imposition of any language that did not respect cultural and religious values.

The representative of the Russian Federation said that her Government was working hard to eliminate violence against women citizens.  However, her delegation could not agree with certain approaches in the draft resolution.  Girls needed to have certain specific types of protection because of their age.  “Girls are children”, and measures to prevent violence against women were insufficient for protecting girls.  Her delegation’s concerns on that issue were not taken into account, and the draft resolution had viewed human rights for women solely through the prism of sexual and reproductive rights.  To achieve real progress, it was vital to observe all human rights, especially the right to development.

The representative of Sudan said that his delegation was happy to join the consensus on the draft resolution, and was committed to ending impunity.  However, it had strong reservations against the reference to the International Criminal Court, as well as to notions that were not internationally agreed upon.  Further, his country believed that the reference to sexual and reproductive health was inappropriate for girls.

A draft resolution on trafficking in women and girls was also approved without a recorded vote (document A/C.3/69/L.21/Rev.1).

The Secretary read out an oral statement regarding budgetary implications of the resolution.

Making a general statement, the representative of the Philippines said the draft text addressed the issue of trafficking in persons, which constituted a serious threat to human dignity, rights and development.  In addressing specific forms of sexual exploitation, timely measures needed to be taken, as the number of victims was increasing.  Noting that the draft text recognized the emergency of the issue for the first time, he said intensified efforts were also needed to devise, enforce and strengthen efforts to combat and eliminate all forms of trafficking in persons.

Also making a statement, the representative of Sudan expressed appreciation to the co-sponsors and highlighted the regional conference on trafficking of women, which had taken place in Sudan.  However, his delegation had reservations about the reference to the International Criminal Court in the draft text.

Also approved without a recorded vote was the draft resolution on enlargement of the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (document A/C.3/69/L.60).

Making a general statement, the representative of Uruguay expressed her country’s commitment to address the situation of refugees and internally displaced persons.  Recalling decision 2014/242 taken by the Economic and Social Council, she expressed her gratitude to the Third Committee for approving the draft resolution by consensus.

Making a general statement, the representative of Azerbaijan said her delegation was opposed to the admission of Armenia to the Executive Committee of the Programme of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, as the country had continued its policy of aggression and occupation.

The representative of Armenia, as a co-sponsor of the draft text, said his delegation was committed to the mandate and mission of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.  His delegation had not opposed Azerbaijan’s application to the Committee, as the primary responsibility was to protect refugees, and not to politicize issues.

The representative of Azerbaijan stated that she rejected the allegations made by her counterpart from Armenia.  The fact of occupation was well-documented, she said.

Next, the Committee turned to a new draft text on protecting children from bullying (document A/C.3/69/L.25/Rev.1).  The Secretary read out a statement regarding budgetary implications.  The representative of Mexico asked that the draft be considered in the afternoon, as some amendments and revisions were being circulated at the moment.  The Secretary stated that if the changes would have budgetary implications, the Secretariat would need time to consider those.  The representative of Mexico stated that the revisions were minimal.

The Committee then considered a number of draft resolutions, clustered under the agenda item of protection and promotion of human rights.

A draft text on the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (document A/C.3/69/L.34) was approved without a recorded vote.

Making a general statement, the representative of Argentina encouraged all States that had not signed the Convention to do so.  The Convention was an important contribution to human rights around the world, and shed light on impunity.  It was the first internationally binding instrument that dealt with the issue of forced disappearances.  Further, it reaffirmed the right of victims to truth and justice.

Next, the Committee took up a draft text on globalization and its impact on the full enjoyment of all human rights (document A/C.3/69/L.38).

Making a statement, the representative of Egypt said that there was broad recognition among Member States that it was necessary to enhance international cooperation to maximize opportunities afforded by globalization, while promoting solidarity in dealing with its challenges.  Developing countries were affected by those challenges, and the draft resolution addressed the need to address them and to minimize their impact on national capacity.

Making a general statement before the vote, the representative of Italy, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said the group strongly believed there was a need to achieve international cooperation in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction.  Also, its member States supported the positive impacts of globalization on the full enjoyment of all human rights.  However, the issue should be processed on a case-by-case basis, using a more balanced approach.

The Committee then approved the text by a recorded vote of 128 in favour, with 53 against and 1 abstention (Papua New Guinea).

The Committee then approved, without a vote, a draft text on combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons, based on religion or belief (document A/C.3/69/L.39/Rev.1).

Making a general statement, the representative of Saudi Arabia, speaking on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, orally revised the resolution, and said that the new language would highlight the solidarity of the international community.

Also making a general statement, the representative of Italy, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that her group was founded on values of tolerance and human rights.  Her delegation read the resolution as a call to States to respond to acts of intolerance, with full respect for international human rights law.  The European Union condemned discrimination and violence on the basis of religion or belief, and was “equally attached” to the freedom of opinion and expression, as those were intrinsically linked to freedom of religion and belief and other human rights.  The international community needed to consolidate its collective response to those who wanted to use religion to fuel violence and extremism.  Therefore, the European Union reiterated that freedom of expression was a powerful and essential tool.  Any restrictions on the freedom of expression would undermine efforts to combat intolerance, and they should not be a pretext for arbitrary restrictions.  Further, no one should invoke cultural or religious traditions in order to restrict the freedom of expression.

Making a statement, the representative of Albania said his delegation fully believed in the freedom of religion and belief.  However, Albania was very concerned about increasing acts of discrimination and incitement to violence against persons based on religion or belief.  Concluding, he invited all Member States to turn the draft text into action.

Next, the Committee turned to a draft resolution on freedom of religion or belief (A/C.3/69/L.40/Rev.1).

Making a statement, the representative of Italy, speaking on behalf of the European Union, read out an oral revision and said that the draft resolution had resulted from negotiations carried out in a spirit of cooperation.  It was imperative to intensify efforts to enhance freedom of religion.  Freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief was essential not only within the international human rights systems.  Every individual had the right to believe, change his or her belief and to not believe.  It was also vital to protect persons belonging to religious minorities against violence.

The Committee approved that draft, as orally revised, without a vote.

Making a statement, the representative of Saudi Arabia, speaking on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, said the topic needed more consistent commitment by the General Assembly.

The Committee also approved without a recorded vote, as orally revised, a draft text on the enhancement of international cooperation in the field of human rights (document A/C.3/69/L.44).

The representative of Cuba, speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement, orally revised the resolution, and said that the draft text had sought to recognize the importance of international cooperation in ensuring full respect for the human rights enshrined in the United Nations Charter.

The representative of the United States said her delegation was pleased to join the consensus.  Also, she underlined the critical role of non-governmental and civil society organizations in resolving human rights issues.

Next, the Committee turned to the draft resolution on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/C.3/69/L.45).

Making a statement, the representative of Cuba, speaking on behalf of Non-Aligned Movement, orally revised the draft resolution and stated that unilateral measures against States should not restrict the social and economic rights of the citizens of those States.  The Non-Aligned Movement had repeatedly expressed its reservations against the use of unilateral measures as political economic tools against countries.  The current draft resolution also referred to the decision of the Human Rights Council to appoint a special rapporteur on the matter.

The Secretary stated that the oral revisions introduced by the representative of Cuba could have budget implications and, therefore, the action on the draft resolution should be deferred.

The representative of Cuba stated that she was in agreement with that.

Next, the Committee took up a draft text on the right to development (document A/C.3/69/L.46).

Making a general statement, the representative of Cuba said the draft text had been long considered and discussed with Member States, reflecting all ideas.

Also making a general statement, the representative of Iran said the Non-Aligned Movement strongly believed the full realization of the right to development and the right of peoples under foreign occupation and colonial domination to self-determination.  The international financial and economic crises had severely affected the economies of developing countries.  It was, therefore, imperative to address the crisis with the view of promoting human development, which was supported by sustained economic growth, poverty eradication and sustainable development.  Thus, she called upon the United Nations and its specialized agencies, funds and programmes to mainstream the right to development in their policies and operational activities.

Also making a general statement, the representative of Italy, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said that his delegation would have preferred that the draft resolution used non-prescriptive language.

Also making a general statement before the vote, the representative of Cuba asked which delegation had requested the vote.

The Chair said that the delegation of the United States had requested the vote.

Speaking in explanation of vote before the vote, the representative of the United States said that the promotion of individual human rights greatly fostered development.  While her delegation agreed that economic development goals must be pursued while taking into account the development needs of present and future generations, her delegation was concerned that the draft resolution included unrelated material on topics that were being addressed elsewhere.  Further, her country could not abide by the language regarding an international legal agreement on the topic.

Next, the Committee took up a draft text on realizing the Millennium Development Goals and other internationally agreed development goals for persons with Disabilities (A/C.3/69/L.10/Rev.1), approving it without a recorded vote.

Making a general statement, the representative of the United States said her delegation was very pleased to see cooperation affirming the human rights and fundamental freedoms of persons with disabilities.  Reiterating her delegation’s support, she noted that States had made a high level commitment on the rights of persons with disabilities as an integral part of the development agenda.

Also making a general statement, Brazil’s representative said the promotion and protection of persons with disabilities was a priority for her Government, backed by the national legislation.

Turning to the draft on follow-up to the Second World Assembly on Ageing (document A/C.3/69/L.14/Rev.2), the Committee postponed its consideration of it until 25 November.

The Committee then took up the draft text on protecting children from bullying (document A/C.3/69/L.25/Rev.1), approving it, as orally revised, without a recorded vote.

After the action, the representative of Italy, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said the draft text had raised international awareness on the issue of bullying.  Evidence had shown that bullying affected all those involved, resulting in emotional problems, aggression and even suicide.  Some children were bullied due to their economic situations or disabilities, others due to gender stereotypes or their gender identity, he added.  Expressing his regret that those issues were not reflected adequately in the draft resolution, he hoped for the report of the Secretary-General on bullying to reflect the situation on the ground, and to develop suggestions on how to deal with it.

Djibouti’s representative, speaking on behalf of the African Group, said she was concerned with any issues that might impede the rights of children.  The issue of bullying should have been reflected in the omnibus resolution on rights of the child.  In light of current absence of a report of the Secretary-General on that issue, as well as of a common understanding of the issue, she said a substantive resolution was premature.  The draft resolution should have been procedural, she added, until additional information on the issue was distributed.

The representative of Panama said bullying was a serious problem, recognized by the reports of the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and of the Special Rapporteur on violence against children.  In order to achieve consensus, a number of elements were eliminated, she added, including detailed information on vulnerability and violence children faced in relation to bullying.

Also making a general statement, the representative of South Africa welcomed the outcome document, which was adopted to protect children from bullying.  Noting that bullying had a negative impact on the rights of children and their well-being, she said her delegation hoped to see more comprehensive solutions in the future texts.

The representative of Chile said bullying had negative effects on children and it needed to be prevented and eliminated.  Acknowledging that bullying occurred in all parts of the world, he said lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) children faced heightened risks.

The representative of Australia said bullying had a damaging effect on the physiological and physical development of children.  In that regard, her Government had initiated a 12-year national plan to meet the needs of children.

The representative of the United States said all children deserved protection.  Also, the report should discuss all forms of bullying based on gender and sexual orientation.

The representative of Saudi Arabia said children should be protected from all forms of violence.  The international cooperation between Member States was very critical to address the issue.  However, countries should respect to cultural and religious values.

The Committee then took note of several documents.  They included a report of the Secretary-General on the status of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (document A/69/260), a report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (document A/69/212) and the annual report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children (document A/69/264).  Other documents were notes by the Secretary-General transmitting the report of the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography (document A/69/262), the summary report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the panel discussion on preventing and eliminating child, early and forced marriage (document A/69/165) and the report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for Human Rights on preventing and eliminating child, early and forced marriage (document A/69/166).  The report of the Secretary-General on the follow-up to the special session of the General Assembly on children (document A/69/258) was also considered.

Next the Committee turned to the draft resolution on human rights and unilateral coercive measures (document A/C.3/69/L.45).

Making a general statement before the vote, the representative of Cuba asked which delegation had requested the vote.

The Chair said it had been requested by the delegation of the United States.

The United States’ delegate said the draft resolution had no basis on international law, as well as no causes to advance human rights.  It was a direct challenge to the sovereign rights of States, she added, to choose the countries it engaged in trade with.  The draft resolution attempted to undermine the international community’s response to acts that threatened peace and security.

The Committee then approved the text by a recorded vote of 124 in favour to 52 against, with 2 abstentions (Central African Republic, Chad).

Speaking after the vote, Costa Rica’s delegate expressed her reservation to operative paragraph 16, as well as asked that operative paragraph 3 was more concise in the future.

The Committee then considered a draft resolution on human rights and extreme poverty (document A/C.3/69/L.48/Rev.1), approving it without a recorded vote.

Speaking after the approval, the representative of the United States was pleased to join the consensus.  Her delegation believed that the eradication of extreme poverty was a major challenge within the process of globalization, which required coordinated and continued inclusive policies.  Although the guiding principle was a helpful resource to formulate poverty reduction policies, it did not fit to each country’s needs.

The Committee also approved without a recorded vote, a draft resolution on preventing and combating corrupt practices and the transfer of proceeds of corruption, facilitating asset recovery and returning such assets to legitimate owners, in particular to countries of origin, in accordance with the United Nations Convention against Corruption (document A/C.3/69/L.18/Rev.1).

Making a general statement, the representative of Liechtenstein thanked other delegations for their efforts to reach consensus.  She reiterated her delegation’s support for cooperating with other actors, including civil society, non-governmental organizations and community-based organizations.

The Committee will meet next at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, 25 November to take action on a number of draft resolutions.

For information media. Not an official record.