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Seventy-sixth Session,
54th Meeting (AM)
GA/12397

General Assembly Takes Action on Second Committee Reports by Adopting 37 Resolutions, 2 Decisions

Texts Aimed at Protecting Global Climate, Combating Illicit Financial Flows among Those Approved

As the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change and glaring inequities continue to wreak havoc on development, the General Assembly today adopted 37 resolutions and two decisions of its Second Committee (Economic and Financial) aimed at reversing setbacks and setting the global community back on track.

By a resolution on “International trade and development”, adopted in a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 2 against (United States, Israel), with no abstentions, the Assembly emphasized the need to combat protectionism and rectify trade-distorting measures inconsistent with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules.  It further emphasized the need for global action to ensure timely, affordable and equitable access to quality COVID-19 vaccines.

A related resolution on “Unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries” was adopted in a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States), with 46 abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly urged nations to eliminate unilateral economic, financial or trade measures unauthorized by relevant United Nations organs, international law or the Charter of the United Nations.  It further called on the international community to condemn and reject measures that impede targeted countries in responding to the pandemic and promoting post-pandemic recovery.

Adopting a resolution on “Commodities” in a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions, the Assembly stressed that lower commodity prices threaten sustainable growth and debt positions in developing countries.  It called for action at the national, regional and international level to address excessive price volatility and support commodity-dependent developing countries in mitigating negative impacts.

A further resolution on “Promotion of international cooperation to combat illicit financial flows and strengthen good practices on assets return to foster sustainable development” was adopted as a whole, without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly called on nations to eliminate base erosion and profit shifting, ensuring all companies pay taxes to Governments of countries where economic activity occurs and value is created.  Prior to the adoption, operative paragraph 3 was retained in a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 41 against, with 8 abstentions (Australia, Canada, Haiti, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Turkey).

Among other macroeconomic resolutions were texts on the international financial system, financial inclusion, illicit financial flows and promoting investments.

Addressing sustainable development, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of humankind”, expressing alarm that greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise globally, and concern that all nations are increasingly vulnerable to climate change.  Noting that these include persistent drought, extreme weather events, land degradation, sea level rise and retreat of mountain glaciers, the Assembly emphasized that mitigation and adaptation to climate change represent an urgent global priority.

Also relating to climate, the Assembly adopted the resolution “Follow-up to and implementation of the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway and the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States”.

By its terms, the Assembly called for urgent and ambitious global action to address the threat and impact of climate change on small island developing States.  It further called for immediate and substantial actions to help these nations recover from the pandemic, addressing their unprecedented health and unfolding economic crises.

By a resolution on “Implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity and its contribution to sustainable development”, the Assembly stressed the urgent need to halt the global decline of biodiversity, which is unprecedented in human history, especially changes in land and sea use, direct exploitation of organisms, climate change, pollution and invasion of alien species.

Adopting a resolution on “Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all”, the Assembly strongly encouraged relevant stakeholders to increase the global share of new, renewable energy for clean, low-emission, low-carbon climate-resilient and affordable energy to reduce the 12.6 million deaths each year due to environmental risks, especially air pollution.

Other sustainable development resolutions focused on the Lebanese oil slick, agricultural technology, tourism in Central America, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, disaster risk reduction, desertification, the United Nations Environment Assembly, education and coastal zone management.

Addressing inequities, the Assembly adopted a resolution on “Eradicating rural poverty to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” in a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 50 against, with 1 abstention (Turkey).  By its terms, the organ stressed the importance of eradicating poverty by formulating rural development strategies, strengthening national monitoring systems and implementing social protection systems.

By an associated resolution on “Agriculture development, food security and nutrition”, the Assembly urged Member States and relevant stakeholders to advance collective actions to address the impacts of the pandemic on agriculture development, food security and nutrition.

On countries with special needs, the Assembly adopted the resolution “Development cooperation with middle-income countries”, requesting the United Nations development system to address diverse development needs of these nations through, inter alia, an assessment of national priorities and needs, considering variables beyond per capita income criteria.

A further resolution was adopted on “Towards global partnerships:  a principle-based approach to enhanced cooperation between the United Nations and all relevant partners”.  By its terms, the Assembly emphasized the vital role played by Governments in promoting responsible business practices, providing and ensuring enforcement of necessary legal and regulatory frameworks according to national legislation and development priorities.

Finally, the organ adopted a decision on “Draft programme of work of the Second Committee for the seventy-seventh session of the General Assembly”.  By a second decision on “Revitalization of the work of the Second Committee”, the Assembly decided to convene up to two informal meetings of the Second Committee in early 2022 to discuss Committee working methods.

Remaining resolutions included texts on information and communications technology (ICT); development financing conferences; science, technology and innovation; culture; poverty eradication decade; least developed and landlocked developing countries; operational activities; South-South cooperation; natural plant fibres; and Palestinian natural resources.

Action on Draft Resolutions

PRATHMA UPRETY (Nepal), Second Committee Rapporteur, introduced the body’s reports containing 37 draft resolutions and 2 draft decisions.

The Assembly first took up the Second Committee’s (Economic and Financial) report on “Information and communications technologies (ICT) for sustainable development” (document A/76/530), containing one eponymous draft resolution.

Adopting it without a vote, the Assembly called on all stakeholders to make bridging digital divides a priority, put into effect sound strategies contributing to development of e-government and focus on pro-poor ICT policies and applications, including access to broadband at the grass-roots level.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Macroeconomic policy questions” (document A/76/531), which contained seven draft resolutions.  It first took up a report on “International trade and development” (document A/76/531/Add.1), which contained two draft resolutions.

By resolution I, on “International trade and development”, adopted in a recorded vote of 178 in favour and 2 against (United States, Israel), with no abstentions, the Assembly emphasized the urgent need to combat protectionism and rectify trade-distorting measures inconsistent with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules.  It further emphasized the critical need for globally coordinated actions to ensure timely, affordable and equitable access to safe, quality and affordable COVID‑19 vaccines, and ensure emergency trade measures create no disruptions to global supply chains.

The Assembly then adopted resolution II on “Unilateral economic measures as a means of political and economic coercion against developing countries” in a recorded vote of 126 in favour to 6 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States), with 46 abstentions.  In so doing, it urged the international community to adopt measures to eliminate unilateral economic, financial or trade measures unauthorized by relevant United Nations organs, inconsistent with international law or the Charter of the United Nations, or contravening basic principles of the multilateral trading system.

The Assembly further called on the international community to condemn and reject the imposition of unilateral coercive economic measures inconsistent with international law and the Charter of the United Nations, which impede the capacity of targeted countries to respond efficiently to the COVID‑19 pandemic and promote post-pandemic recovery.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “International financial system and development” (document A/76/531/Add.2) containing an eponymous resolution therein, which it adopted in a recorded vote of 178 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly stressed the critical importance of a stable, inclusive and enabling global economic environment for advancing sustainable development, reliable and effective financing of development and implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, mobilizing public and private, as well as domestic and international resources.

The Committee then turned to the report “External debt sustainability and development” (A/76/531/Add.3), adopting an eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly would emphasize the importance of timely, effective and durable solutions to debt problems of developing countries to promote their economic growth and development.  Further, it stressed the need to assist developing countries in avoiding a build-up of unsustainable debt to reduce the risk of relapsing into another debt crisis.

The Assembly then turned to the report “Commodities” (document A/76/531/Add.4), adopting a resolution therein of the same name in a recorded vote of 177 in favour to 1 against (United States), with no abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly stressed that developing countries face special challenges, as lower prices for commodities they produce threaten sustainable growth and debt positions.  It called for action at the national, regional and international level to address excessive price volatility and support commodity-dependent developing countries in mitigating negative impacts.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Financial inclusion for sustainable development” (document A/76/531/Add.5), adopting the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.

By that resolution, the Assembly encouraged the international community to further develop financial literacy and education programmes to ensure all learners acquire skills needed to access financial services, in particular women and girls, farmers and workers in micro-, small and medium-sized enterprises.

It then turned to the report “Promotion of international cooperation to combat illicit financial flows and strengthen good practices on assets return to foster sustainable development” (document A/76/531/Add.6).  Retaining operative paragraph 3 of an eponymous resolution contained therein in a recorded vote of 118 in favour to 41 against, with 8 abstentions (Australia, Canada, Haiti, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Turkey), the Assembly then adopted the resolution as a whole, without a vote.

By its terms, the Assembly called on all States to work together to eliminate base erosion and profit shifting and ensure that all companies, including multinationals, pay taxes to Governments of countries where economic activity occurs and value is created, according to national and international laws and policies.

It then considered the report “Promoting investments for sustainable development” (document A/76/531/Add.7), adopting a resolution therein of the same name without a vote.  By that text, the Assembly called on the United Nations system and relevant stakeholders to support developing countries in closing Sustainable Development Goals investment gaps on the use of public finance to leverage private investment for projects benefiting sustainable development.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Follow-up to and implementation of the outcomes of the International Conferences on Financing for Development” (document A/76/532), adopting an eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By that text, it emphasized the need to work towards the full and timely implementation of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development.

The organ then acted on the report “Sustainable development” (document A/76/533), which contained 14 draft resolutions.

Addressing that topic, the representative of Haiti, noting that sustainable development includes the eradication of poverty and hunger by the year 2030, stressed the importance of this goal for nations living with social injustice, incorrectly described as underdevelopment.  Achieving the goal will require redefining development, he said, which should not be limited to economic growth or macroeconomic stability.  International financial institutions must recognize that every country has its own needs, and that development requires deep-rooted transformation targeting the poorest nations.

It first addressed resolution I, “Oil slick on Lebanese shores”, adopting it in a recorded vote of 161 in favour to 8 against (Australia, Canada, Israel, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, United States), with 8 abstentions (Cameroon, Dominica, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Rwanda, South Sudan, Tonga).  By its terms, the Assembly acknowledged that environmental damage to Lebanon from the oil slick amounted to $856.4 million in 2014 and requested the Secretary-General to urge United Nations bodies involved in the initial assessment of damage to undertake a further study.

Further to the resolution, the Assembly requested the Government of Israel to assume responsibility for prompt and adequate compensation to Lebanon for damage.  It also requested Israel to compensate other countries directly affected by the oil slick, such as Syria, whose shores were partially polluted.

The Assembly then adopted resolution II, “Agricultural technology for sustainable development” in a recorded vote of 152 in favour to 1 against (Syria), with 27 abstentions.

By that text, the Assembly urged Member States, relevant United Nations organizations and other stakeholders to improve development of sustainable agricultural technologies and their transfer to developing countries, and encourage international, regional and national efforts to strengthen capacity and foster use of local know-how in developing countries, especially smallholder and family farmers.

By resolution III, “Sustainable tourism and sustainable development in Central America”, adopted without a vote, the Assembly recognized the major role sustainable tourism plays in Central American development, as an instrument of social inclusion that generates jobs and contributes to improved quality of life, aimed at achieving poverty eradication.

Next, the Assembly turned to the report, “Promoting Towards the achievement of sustainable development:  implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including through sustainable consumption and production, building on Agenda 21” (document A/76/533/Add.1).  Acting without a vote, it adopted an eponymous resolution therein, by which the Assembly urged the international community to assist developing countries build their scientific and technical capacity in shifting towards more sustainable consumption and production patterns.

The Assembly then considered the report “Follow-up to and implementation of the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway and the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States” (document A/76/533/Add.2).

Without a vote, it adopted a resolution therein of the same name, calling for urgent and ambitious global action to address the threat and impact of climate change on small island developing States.  It further called for immediate and substantial actions to those States recover from the pandemic, addressing the unprecedented health and economic crises unfolding in these nations.

Acting without a vote on the report “Disaster risk reduction” (document A/76/533/Add.3), the Assembly adopted the eponymous resolution therein on “Disaster risk reduction”.  By its terms, the Assembly urged States to conduct multi-hazard disaster risk assessments, considering climate change projections, to support evidence-based disaster risk reduction strategies, and guide risk-informed development investments by the private and public sectors.

Next, it took up the report “Protection of global climate for present and future generations of humankind” (document A/76/533/Add.4), retaining operative paragraph 10 of the resolution therein of the same name in a recorded vote of 100 in favour to 57 against, with 10 abstentions (Antigua and Barbuda, Chile, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Fiji, Haiti, Honduras, Maldives, Philippines).  The Assembly then adopted the resolution as a whole without a vote.

By that resolution, the Assembly expressed profound alarm that greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise globally, and deep concern that all countries are increasingly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change.  Noting that these include persistent drought, extreme weather events, land degradation, sea level rise and retreat of mountain glaciers, the Assembly emphasized that mitigation and adaptation to climate change represent an urgent global priority.

Also by the text, the Assembly would stress the need to strengthen the global response to climate change by increasing countries’ abilities to adapt to its adverse effects.  It further stressed the importance of mobilizing means of implementation from all sources, including adequate financial support for mitigation and adaptation, considering the specific needs of developing countries.

The Assembly then turned to the report “Implementation of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification in Those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, Particularly in Africa” (document A/76/533/Add.5), adopting the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.

By that text, the Assembly encouraged public and private sectors to invest in developing, adapting and scaling up application of technologies, enabling policies, methods and tools to combat desertification, land degradation and drought in different regions, and boost knowledge exchange, including traditional knowledge, capacity‑building and technology‑sharing on mutually agreed terms.

Next, the Assembly considered the report “Implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity and its contribution to sustainable development” (document A/76/533/Add.6), adopting a resolution therein of the same name without a vote.

By its terms, the Assembly stressed the urgent need to halt the global decline of biodiversity, which is unprecedented in human history, particularly changes in land and sea use, direct exploitation of organisms, climate change, pollution and invasion of alien species.  It urged parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity to ensure the coherence and complementarity of a post‑2020 global biodiversity framework with other existing or upcoming international processes, including the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

The Assembly then took up the “Report of the United Nations Environment Assembly of the United Nations Environment Programme” (document A/76/533/Add.7), containing one eponymous resolution.  Adopting it without a vote, the Assembly expressed concern about global environmental assessments indicating that, despite availability of solutions to common environmental challenges, the planet is increasingly polluted, affected by adverse effects of climate change, quickly losing its biodiversity and experiencing widespread environmental degradation.

Considering next the report “Education for sustainable development in the framework of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” (document A/76/533/Add.8), the Assembly adopted a resolution of the same name without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly called for scaled up efforts to prioritize education and safely reopen educational institutions for in‑person learning, based on scientific evidence and considering local contexts, while prioritizing the health and safety of students and educators.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all” (document A/76/533/Add.9), containing one eponymous resolution.  Adopting it without a vote, it strongly encouraged relevant stakeholders to achieve universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy, and increase the global share of new and renewable energy, for clean, low‑emission, low‑carbon climate‑resilient and affordable energy to reduce the 12.6 million deaths each year attributed to environmental risks, especially air pollution.

It then considered the report on “Combating sand and dust storms” (document A/76/533/Add.10), adopting the resolution of the same name contained therein by a recorded vote of 179 in favour to 2 against (Israel, United States) with 1 abstention (Australia).  By the text, the Assembly emphasized that sand and dust storm issues will continue to constitute important components of the global coalition on health, environment and climate change launched in May 2018 by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) to improve coordination and reduce the 12.6 million deaths each year that are attributed to environmental risks, especially air pollution.

Acting then on the report “Strengthening cooperation for integrated coastal zone management for achieving sustainable development” (document A/76/533/Add.11), the Assembly adopted the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By its terms, it called on Member States and other actors, including the private sector, civil society and academia, to address the marine litter problem, including plastic litter and microplastics, which impacts coastal management.

The representative of Turkey, speaking in explanation of position, said that her country joined consensus on the resolution, fully committed to the protection of coastal and marine environments.  Turkey is not party to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which is not the only legal framework that regulates all activities in the ocean and the seas, she said.  In that regard, her country disassociates itself from references made in the resolution to that Convention.  Turkey's support for consensus on the text should not be interpreted as a change in its legal position.

The representative of Colombia reaffirmed support for strengthening cooperation in integrated coastal management, noting that his Government recently announced an extension by 16,000 hectares of marine areas in the Eastern Pacific to help protect land and marine systems.  His country joins consensus on the resolution, but, in relation to preambular paragraph 2, has not ratified the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, provisions of which, therefore, are not applicable to Colombia, unless expressly stated.  Moreover, it does not share the opinion that the Convention on the Law of the Sea is the sole legal framework regulating oceanic activities.

The representative of El Salvador disassociated her delegation from language in the resolution under preambular paragraph 2, which refers to the Convention on the Law of the Sea, noting that it is not the only convention that represents the law of the sea.  Her country is not a State party to that instrument and thus enters its reservations to any mention of the Convention of the Law of the Sea as the exclusive framework governing ocean activities, she said, noting its readiness to work with other States in the management and maintenance of marine and coastal resources.

Next, the Assembly considered the report “Globalization and interdependence” (document A/76/534), which contained three draft resolutions.  Turning to the report on “Science, technology and innovation for sustainable development” (document A/76/534/Add.1), the organ adopted the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By that text, it underscored the need to adopt science, technology and innovation strategies as integral elements of national sustainable development plans to strengthen knowledge‑sharing and scale up investments in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.

The Assembly then took up the report “Culture and sustainable development” (document A/76/534/Add.2), adopting without a vote a resolution therein of the same name.  By its terms, the organ called for enhanced support, including additional financial resources and investments, for cultural and creative sectors in the context of COVID‑19 recovery efforts, recognizing culture’s fundamental role in societies to protect artists and cultural professionals, strengthen linkages between culture and education, and safeguard cultural heritage.

Next, the Assembly turned to the report “Development cooperation with middle‑income countries” (document A/76/534/Add.3), adopting the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By that text, it requested the United Nations development system to ensure it addresses the diverse development needs of middle‑income countries through, inter alia, an accurate assessment of national priorities and needs of these States, considering variables beyond per capita income criteria.

It then considered the report “Groups of countries in special situations” (document A/76/535), which contained two resolutions.

First taking up the report on “Follow‑up to the Fourth United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries” (document A/76/535/Add.1), the Assembly adopted the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By its terms, it called on the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) to focus its analytical work on least developed countries, with an emphasis on productive capacities, their measurement, structural transformation and trade and development linkages.

Next, it took up the report “Follow‑up to the second United Nations Conference on Landlocked Developing Countries” (document A/76/535/Add.2), adopting without a vote a resolution therein of the same name.  By the text, it stressed that harmonization, simplification and standardization of rules and documentation should be promoted, including full and effective implementation of international conventions on transport and transit and bilateral, subregional and regional agreements.

It then considered the report “Eradication of poverty and other development issues” (document A/76/536), which contained two resolutions.

Addressing the report on “Implementation of the Third United Nations Decade for the Eradication of Poverty (2018–2027)” (document A/76/536/Add.1), the Assembly adopted without a vote a resolution therein of the same name.  By its terms, the Assembly encouraged the international community to support developing countries eradicate poverty, achieve gender equality, and empower women and girls, the poor and people in vulnerable situations.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Eradicating rural poverty to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” (document A/76/536/Add.2), adopting an eponymous resolution therein with a recorded vote of 128 in favour to 50 against, with 1 abstention (Turkey).  By the text, it stressed the importance of taking targeted measures to eradicate poverty through rural development strategies with clear poverty eradication goals, strengthening national statistical capacity and monitoring systems and implementing nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures.

It then considered the report “Operational activities for development” (document A/76/537), which contained two resolutions.

First turning to the report “Operational activities for development of the United Nations system” (document A/76/537/Add.1), the Assembly adopted the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By the text, it reaffirmed the commitment at the heart of the 2030 Agenda to leave no one behind, commit to taking more tangible steps to support people in vulnerable situations and reach the furthest behind first.

The Assembly then considered the report “South‑South cooperation” (document A/76/537/Add.2), adopting the resolution therein of the same name without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly encouraged the continuation and advancement of South‑South cooperation and triangular cooperation on COVID-19 response and recovery efforts in pursuing the 2030 Agenda.

The Assembly then took up the report “Agriculture development, food security and nutrition” (document A/76/538), which contained two resolutions.

Considering the report “Agriculture development, food security and nutrition” (document A/76/538/Add.1), it adopted the eponymous resolution therein without a vote.  By its terms, the Assembly urged Member States and all relevant stakeholders to advance collective actions to address the impacts of the pandemic on agriculture development, food security and nutrition, and to achieve the 2030 Agenda.

The organ then turned to the report “Natural plant fibres and sustainable development” (document A/76/538/Add.2), adopting the resolution therein of the same name without a vote.  By the text, the Assembly underlined the importance of stepped-up funding from all sources as well as alternative sources of finance, for sustainable, inclusive and resilient recovery in sectors related to natural plant fibres, including through promotion of reliable value chains, strengthened rural financial markets and social protection systems.

Next, it took up the report “Towards global partnerships” (document A/76/539), adopting without a vote the resolution contained therein on “Towards global partnerships:  a principle‑based approach to enhanced cooperation between the United Nations and all relevant partners”.

By its terms, the Assembly emphasized the vital role played by Governments in promoting responsible business practices, including providing and ensuring enforcement of the necessary legal and regulatory frameworks in accordance with national legislation and development priorities, inviting them to support United Nations efforts to engage with the private sector and other relevant stakeholders.

It then turned to the report “Permanent sovereignty of the Palestinian people in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and of the Arab population in the occupied Syrian Golan over their natural resources” (document A/76/540), adopting an eponymous resolution therein by a recorded vote of 156 in favour to 7 against (Canada, Federated States of Micronesia, Israel, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, United States) with 15 abstentions.

By its terms, the Assembly demanded that Israel, the occupying Power, cease the exploitation, damage, cause of loss or depletion and endangerment of the natural resources in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan.

Next, the Assembly took up the report “Revitalization of the work of the General Assembly” (document A/76/542), which contained two decisions.  Acting without a vote, it adopted decision I on “Draft programme of work of the Second Committee for the seventy‑seventh session of the General Assembly”.  The organ then adopted decision II on “Revitalization of the work of the Second Committee”, deciding to convene up to two informal meetings of the Second Committee in early 2022 to discuss Committee working methods.

The Assembly then took up the report “Programme planning” (document A/76/541), regarding the working arrangements of the Committee for the seventy‑sixth session.  It decided that no action was required on the item.

The representative of Guinea, speaking for the “Group of 77” developing countries and China in explanation of position, expressed disappointment with certain references in operative paragraph 4, relating to the allocation of special drawing rights, in the resolution on “Follow‑up to and implementation of the outcomes of the International Conferences on Financing for Development”.  He said the bloc does not support the references to “Member States able to do so” and “vulnerable developing countries” in operative paragraph 4 of that resolution, noting that those references are not agreed upon language and should not be used as a basis for future negotiations.  It would have preferred “developed countries” and “all developing countries” respectively.  Moreover, there should have been a more consistent approach towards language on special drawing rights in the resolutions on “Follow‑up to and implementation of the outcomes of the International Conferences on Financing for Development”, “External debt sustainability and development” and “International financial system and development”.

The Assembly then concluded its consideration of all reports of the Second Committee before it for the current meeting, suspending its meeting until reports of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) are available for its consideration.

For information media. Not an official record.